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Welcome to the Science Summit at UNGA76, a major contribution to advancing Science for the UN SDGs. Online from 14- September - 5 October 2021.
ISC will organise the second edition of the UNGA76 Science Summit around the 76th United Nations General Assembly (SSUNGA76) in September 2021. The objective of the virtual meeting will be to raise awareness of the role and contribution of science to the attainment of the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals. It will demonstrate initiatives that provide models for global science mechanisms and activities in support of the SDGs, particularly in science infrastructure and capacity building. Science is and will enable sustainable economic, environmental, and societal development. Science is more than a funding prioritisation exercise: science is impacting all areas of policy-making and is playing a more critical role in how policy objectives are achieved and the consequent benefit to people everywhere, including responses to global challenges.
Engagement with policy leadership is more important than ever: UNGA76 is a unique forum for science to demonstrate how policy and political leadership can benefit from innovation. Central to this is the role of nonstate actors and the multilateral fora, which increasingly determine how priorities are set. Science needs to be part of this dialogue and inform outputs through thought leadership, evidence, insights, analysis, and innovation.

Registration is available here.
avatar for Pedro Alonso

Pedro Alonso

World Health Organization (WHO)
Director Global Malaria Programme
Dr Pedro L. Alonso is the Director of the WHO Global Malaria Programme in Geneva, Switzerland. The Global Malaria Programme is responsible for the coordination of WHO's global efforts to control and eliminate malaria and sets evidence-based norms, standards, policies and guidelines to support malaria-affected countries around the world.

A national of Spain, Dr Alonso has spent over 30 years in public health. His scientific research work has focused on key determinants of morbidity and mortality in the most vulnerable population groups. He has published over 300 articles in international peer-reviewed journals – primarily on malaria treatment, vaccine trials and preventive therapies – and has served on several national and international committees. He is committed to capacity building of both institutions and individuals, primarily in Africa.

Prior to taking up the WHO position, Dr Alonso was Director of the Barcelona Institute for Global Health (ISGlobal), Professor of Global Health at the University of Barcelona, and President of the Governing Board of the Manhiça Foundation and the Manhiça Health Research Centre in Mozambique.